Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
FACTDROP: US Senate Passes Controversial Security 'Spy' Bill CISA
Photobucket

10/28/2015

US Senate Passes Controversial Security 'Spy' Bill CISA



Πηγή: telesutv
28 Oct 2015


Civil liberties groups have long been trying to convince congress to sack the bill, calling it an invasion of privacy.

The United States Senate passed Tuesday a controversial bill that freedom of speech advocates say grants governments new means to monitor its citizens, under the guise of security protection.

Under the new Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, companies will be allowed and encouraged to share customer data with the Department of Homeland Security that it deems could be a cybersecurity threat.

The DHS could then pass on the data to other agencies, like the FBI and National Security Agency, which would theoretically use it to defend the corporation and the customer under threat of cyber attacks.

Privacy advocates and civil liberties groups have long been urging Congress to sack the bill, or at least include certain reforms, calling it an invasion of privacy that allows companies to share users' information with government without a warrant.

The bill also strikes down other already existing privacy laws, under the guise of added security.

The DHS itself had even spoken against the bill, saying it could derail “important privacy protections,” while tech companies argued that it should be rewritten.

“The incentive and the framework it creates is for companies to quickly and massively collect user information and ship it to the government,” Mark Jaycox, a legislative analyst for the civil liberties group the Electronic Frontier Foundation told Wired. “As soon as you do, you obtain broad immunity, even if you’ve violated privacy law.”

Exiled privacy activist Edward Snowden has echoed these sentiments and urged Congress to stop CISA.

“CISA gives companies legal immunity for violating privacy laws if they also give your data to the government,” tweeted Snowden earlier this week, following with a wave of further criticism of the bill.


Supporters of the bill argue that CISA will protect user data from getting into the wrong hands. The bill was introduced by Democrat Senator Dianne Feinstein in June 2014 after several high profile cyber attacks targeted U.S. corporations, including Anthem, Sony, and the Office of Personnel Management.

The advocacy of civil liberties groups slowed down the bill's passing as the Senate debated privacy protection reforms.

However, in the end all privacy reforms were struck down and CISA was passed by a 74 to 21 vote.

The legislation will now go to a conference committee between the Senate and the House of Representatives, which already passed its own version of CISA. If that is approved, the bill would head to President Barack Obama.




Civil liberties groups have long been trying to convince congress to sack the bill, calling it an invasion of privacy.
The United States Senate passed Tuesday a controversial bill that freedom of speech advocates say grants governments new means to monitor its citizens, under the guise of security protection.

Under the new Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, companies will be allowed and encouraged to share customer data with the Department of Homeland Security that it deems could be a cybersecurity threat.

The DHS could then pass on the data to other agencies, like the FBI and National Security Agency, which would theoretically use it to defend the corporation and the customer under threat of cyber attacks.

Privacy advocates and civil liberties groups have long been urging Congress to sack the bill, or at least include certain reforms, calling it an invasion of privacy that allows companies to share users' information with government without a warrant.

The bill also strikes down other already existing privacy laws, under the guise of added security.

The DHS itself had even spoken against the bill, saying it could derail “important privacy protections,” while tech companies argued that it should be rewritten.

“The incentive and the framework it creates is for companies to quickly and massively collect user information and ship it to the government,” Mark Jaycox, a legislative analyst for the civil liberties group the Electronic Frontier Foundation told Wired. “As soon as you do, you obtain broad immunity, even if you’ve violated privacy law.”

Exiled privacy activist Edward Snowden has echoed these sentiments and urged Congress to stop CISA.

“CISA gives companies legal immunity for violating privacy laws if they also give your data to the government,” tweeted Snowden earlier this week, following with a wave of further criticism of the bill.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/US-Senate-Passes-Controversial-Security-Spy-Bill-CISA-20151028-0005.html?". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Civil liberties groups have long been trying to convince congress to sack the bill, calling it an invasion of privacy.
The United States Senate passed Tuesday a controversial bill that freedom of speech advocates say grants governments new means to monitor its citizens, under the guise of security protection.

Under the new Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, companies will be allowed and encouraged to share customer data with the Department of Homeland Security that it deems could be a cybersecurity threat.

The DHS could then pass on the data to other agencies, like the FBI and National Security Agency, which would theoretically use it to defend the corporation and the customer under threat of cyber attacks.

Privacy advocates and civil liberties groups have long been urging Congress to sack the bill, or at least include certain reforms, calling it an invasion of privacy that allows companies to share users' information with government without a warrant.

The bill also strikes down other already existing privacy laws, under the guise of added security.

The DHS itself had even spoken against the bill, saying it could derail “important privacy protections,” while tech companies argued that it should be rewritten.

“The incentive and the framework it creates is for companies to quickly and massively collect user information and ship it to the government,” Mark Jaycox, a legislative analyst for the civil liberties group the Electronic Frontier Foundation told Wired. “As soon as you do, you obtain broad immunity, even if you’ve violated privacy law.”

Exiled privacy activist Edward Snowden has echoed these sentiments and urged Congress to stop CISA.

“CISA gives companies legal immunity for violating privacy laws if they also give your data to the government,” tweeted Snowden earlier this week, following with a wave of further criticism of the bill.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/US-Senate-Passes-Controversial-Security-Spy-Bill-CISA-20151028-0005.html?". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english
Civil liberties groups have long been trying to convince congress to sack the bill, calling it an invasion of privacy.
The United States Senate passed Tuesday a controversial bill that freedom of speech advocates say grants governments new means to monitor its citizens, under the guise of security protection.

Under the new Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, companies will be allowed and encouraged to share customer data with the Department of Homeland Security that it deems could be a cybersecurity threat.

The DHS could then pass on the data to other agencies, like the FBI and National Security Agency, which would theoretically use it to defend the corporation and the customer under threat of cyber attacks.

Privacy advocates and civil liberties groups have long been urging Congress to sack the bill, or at least include certain reforms, calling it an invasion of privacy that allows companies to share users' information with government without a warrant.

The bill also strikes down other already existing privacy laws, under the guise of added security.

The DHS itself had even spoken against the bill, saying it could derail “important privacy protections,” while tech companies argued that it should be rewritten.

“The incentive and the framework it creates is for companies to quickly and massively collect user information and ship it to the government,” Mark Jaycox, a legislative analyst for the civil liberties group the Electronic Frontier Foundation told Wired. “As soon as you do, you obtain broad immunity, even if you’ve violated privacy law.”

Exiled privacy activist Edward Snowden has echoed these sentiments and urged Congress to stop CISA.

“CISA gives companies legal immunity for violating privacy laws if they also give your data to the government,” tweeted Snowden earlier this week, following with a wave of further criticism of the bill.

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/US-Senate-Passes-Controversial-Security-Spy-Bill-CISA-20151028-0005.html?". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english

No comments:

Post a Comment